6 Days of Digging Approved

Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) has approved a 6 day dig.

The official press release announcing the approved digs by WDFW is on the agency’s website.

Make sure you have a valid clamming license for the 2020-2021 season.

Check the Beach Map to ensure you are on the correct approved beach.

Upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

  • Oct. 16, Friday, 7:00 pm, -0.7; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 17, Saturday, 7:47 pm, -1.3; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 18, Sunday, 8:35 pm, -1.5; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 19, Monday, 9:24 pm, -1.4; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 20, Tuesday, 10:16 pm, -1.0; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 21, Wednesday, 11:12 pm, -0.5; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

No digging is allowed before noon.

Get your Razor Clam Society T-shirts here! Free shipping!!!!

The DAILY LIMIT per person is 15 clams, no matter what condition they are in, once removed from the sand. That limit is subject to change. Always check with official sources if you have any questions. Digging BEFORE Noon during the Fall/Winter season on the approved days is not allowed. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. And, each digger must keep their razor clams in a separate container. Don’t mix your clams. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

3 More Digs Approved!

According to an email received from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) Coastal Shellfish Manager, Dan Ayres, 3 (that’s THREE) more days of razor clam digging have been approved, adding to the 4 previously approved dig dates that were announced.

Today was the 2020-2021 razor clamming season opener. The weather was warm and amazing out on the beach. Winds were light… the clams were digging deep and fast and put up a good fight.

Be sure to share your stories and experiences digging clams with us. #razorclamsociety @razorclamsociety

Upcoming APPROVED digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

AM TIDES ONLY

Sept. 16, Wednesday, 6:17 am, -1.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

Sept. 17, Thursday, 6:58 am, -1.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Sept. 18, Friday, 7:39 am, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

Sept. 19, Saturday, 8:19 am, -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

PM TIDES ONLY

Sept. 20, Sunday, 9:43 pm, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

Sept. 21, Monday, 10:37 pm, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Sept. 22, Tuesday, 11:37 pm, -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

Check the Beach Map to ensure you are on the correct approved beach.

Get your Razor Clam Society T-shirts here! Free shipping!!!!

Be sure to share your stories and experiences digging clams with us. #razorclamsociety @razorclamsociety

The DAILY LIMIT per person is 15 clams, no matter what condition they are in, once removed from the sand. That limit is subject to change. Always check with official sources if you have any questions. Digging BEFORE Noon during the Fall/Winter season on the approved days is not allowed. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. And, each digger must keep their razor clams in a separate container. Don’t mix your clams. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

2020-2021 Razor Clam Season Has Arrived: 4 Days of Digs APPROVED!!!

The Razor Clam Society had a gut feeling that the 2020-2021 razor clam season was about to kick off…. and we are so pleased to announce the following press release from the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife:

This is the season opener we have all been waiting for.

The full press release can be found here.

Make sure you have a valid clamming license for the 2020-2021 season.

As always, the approved dig was only made available to the public because of the hard work that state shellfish managers put in, plus the watchful eye of the Department of Health that conducts the marine toxin tests to ensure clams are safe to eat.

Check the Beach Map to ensure you are on the correct approved beach.

Upcoming digs are scheduled on the following dates, beaches and low tides:

A.M. TIDES:

  • Sept. 16, Wednesday, 6:17 am, -1.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Sept. 17, Thursday, 6:58 am, -1.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Sept. 18, Friday, 7:39 am, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Sept. 19, Saturday, 8:19 am, -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

No digging is allowed AFTER noon.

Get your Razor Clam Society T-shirts here! Free shipping!!!!

Share your clamming experience with us on the Social Media! #razorclamsociety

The DAILY LIMIT per person is 15 clams, no matter what condition they are in, once removed from the sand. That limit is subject to change. Always check with official sources if you have any questions. Digging BEFORE Noon during the Fall/Winter season on the approved days is not allowed. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. And, each digger must keep their razor clams in a separate container. Don’t mix your clams. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

The following is a list of the tentative digs for the remainder of the calendar year:


P.M. TIDES:

  • Sept. 20, Sunday, 9:43 pm, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Sept. 21, Monday, 10:37 pm, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Sept. 22, Tuesday, 11:37 pm, -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 16, Friday, 7:00 pm, -0.7; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 17, Saturday, 7:47 pm, -1.3; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 18, Sunday, 8:35 pm, -1.5; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 19, Monday, 9:24 pm, -1.4; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 20, Tuesday, 10:16 pm, -1.0; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 21, Wednesday, 11:12 pm, -0.5; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Oct. 31, Saturday, 7:26 pm, 0.0; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 1, Sunday, 6:59 pm, -0.1; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 2, Monday, 7:33 pm, -0.1; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Nov. 3, Tuesday, 8:08 pm, -0.1; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 13, Friday, 4:58 pm, -0.3; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 14, Saturday, 5:45 pm, -1.3; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Nov. 15, Sunday, 6:32 pm, -1.7; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 16, Monday, 7:19 pm, -1.8; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Nov. 17, Tuesday, 8:06 pm, -1.6; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 18, Wednesday, 8:56 pm, -1.1; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Nov. 19, Thursday, 9:47 pm, -0.5; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 1, Tuesday, 7:14 pm, -0.4; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 2, Wednesday, 7:51 pm, -0.4; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 3, Thursday, 8:30 pm, -0.3; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 4, Friday, 9:12 pm, -0.1; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 12, Saturday, 4:44 pm, -0.8; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 13, Sunday, 5:32 pm, -1.4; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 14, Monday, 6:19 pm, -1.7; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 15, Tuesday, 7:05pm, -1.7; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 16, Wednesday, 7:50 pm, -1.5; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 17, Thursday, 8:35 pm, -1.0; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 18, Friday, 9:21 pm, -0.4; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 28, Monday, 5:43 pm, -0.2; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 29, Tuesday, 6:20 pm, -0.5; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 30, Wednesday, 6:57 pm, -0.7; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 31, Thursday, 7:34 pm, -0.7; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

2020 WDFW Hunting Prospects Now Available

In an effort to keep outdoor enthusiasts up to date on some of the most recent developments with Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, we encourage you to review the 2020 Hunting Prospects publication that is now available HERE.

Get outdoors and enjoy!

Have an excellent Labor Day Weekend!

Hood Canal Oyster Season Closures

Puget Sound oyster seasons to close on some Hood Canal beaches; many beaches remain open

OLYMPIA – Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) shellfish managers have seen record-setting participation in recreational clam and oyster harvest in Puget Sound this year. Higher participation has resulted in three Hood Canal beaches, which previously closed for clam and mussel harvest, now closing for oyster harvest earlier than expected. This closure is needed to ensure clam and oyster gathering opportunities in future seasons.

Starting on Tuesday, Sept. 1, oyster seasons will close at Hood Canal’s Belfair State Park, the Potlatch beaches and Twanoh State Park. The Department previously closed clam and mussel seasons on these same beaches to maintain future gathering opportunities after the state reached its share of harvest. Oyster seasons will now also be closed.

“Unfortunately, one of the things we’ve seen is that people aren’t recognizing that clam and mussel seasons may vary from oyster seasons on some beaches,” said Camille Speck, Puget Sound Intertidal Bivalve Manager for WDFW. “As a result, we must now close oysters on these beaches in order to prevent continued illegal clam harvest that will impact future years’ clam seasons and populations.”

Despite previous clam closures at several sites, managers are reporting consistently high numbers of people showing up to harvest clams, “even though these beaches have signs indicating the closures,” said Speck.

“We want to encourage people to spread out and try some of the less-visited beaches,” said Speck. “The Washington Shellfish Safety Map is designed to help clam, mussel and oyster enthusiasts locate open—and lesser-known—beaches, close to home.”

Harvesters can also find up-to-date information on seasons and shellfish safety information on the Washington Shellfish Safety Map webpage.

“Biotoxin closures are in effect in some areas and conditions can change quickly, so checking this website the same day you plan to harvest is a crucial step,” said Speck.

Clam and oyster season and beach information is additionally available at WDFW clam, mussel, and oyster beach webpage. Harvesters can call the WDFW shellfish hotline at 1-866-880-5431 as well.

WDFW will continue to monitor shellfish harvest levels across Puget Sound, and staff expect to make additional beach and season closures this season as necessary.

WDFW reminds harvesters to fill their clam holes after digging, leave oyster shells on the beach, and abide by size and daily limits to help maintain a sustainable resource and avoid getting a ticket. WDFW is also asking oyster and clam harvesters to give other beach visitors and access site staff space and abide by responsible recreation guidelines when visiting. If a park or access site is busy or at capacity, have a backup plan to visit another site.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting, and perpetuating fish, wildlife, and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting, and other recreation opportunities.

Puget Sound clam and mussel seasons to close on some Hood Canal beaches; many beaches remain open

This just in from WDFW

Puget Sound clam and mussel seasons to close on some Hood Canal beaches; many beaches remain open

OLYMPIA – Washington clammers have been enjoying the opportunity to harvest shellfish on Puget Sound beaches this season, but higher participation means three Puget Sound beaches will close for clam harvest earlier than expected to help ensure gathering opportunities for years to come.

Starting Friday, Aug. 14, clam and mussel seasons will close at Hood Canal’s Belfair State Park, the Potlatch beaches and Twanoh State Park.

“It has been great to see folks getting out and enjoying Puget Sound’s wonderful intertidal shellfish harvesting opportunities,” said Camille Speck, Puget Sound intertidal bivalve manager for WDFW. 

“We are seeing record-setting participation this year as people seek to find summer fun closer to home, which has resulted in the state reaching our share of clams earlier than anticipated at these three beaches.”

“On peak low tide weekend days,” Speck adds, “shellfishing activity is as much as five times higher over 2019 at Potlatch State Park, and recreational use patterns this year are higher across all combinations of tide and day of the week at these popular beaches.”

While continued high participation may require additional management actions this year, many beaches remain open across the state.

“We want to encourage people to spread out and check out some of the less-visited beaches,” said Speck. “This will help preserve the long-term health of shellfish beaches and future years’ opportunity,” she added.

Harvesters can find up-to-date information on seasons and shellfish safety information on Washington’s Shellfish Safety Map webpage.

The Washington Shellfish Safety Map will help clam, mussel and oyster enthusiasts locate open預nd lesser-known傭eaches, close to home,” said Speck. Biotoxin closures are in effect in some areas and conditions can change quickly, so checking this website the same day you plan to harvest is a crucial step, added Speck.

Clam and oyster season and beach information is also available at WDFW clam, mussel, and oyster beach webpage.

WDFW reminds harvesters to fill their clam holes after digging, leave oyster shells on the beach, and abide by size and daily limits to help maintain a sustainable resource and avoid a ticket.

WDFW is also asking for cooperation from oyster and clam harvesters to reduce risk. Please give other beach visitors and access site staff space and abide by responsible recreation guidelines when visiting. If a park or access site is busy or at capacity, please consider having a backup plan and visiting another site.

WDFW will continue to monitor harvest levels across Puget Sound and adjust seasons as necessary. Harvesters are advised to stay up to date on clam, mussel, and oyster seasons on their favorite beaches.

Additional information can also be found on the WDFW shellfish hotline at 1-866-880-5431.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting, and perpetuating fish, wildlife, and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting, and other recreation opportunities.

Celebrate Ceviche Day!

Because… who doesn’t like fresh raw seafood and citrus juice….

WDFW, Washington Sea Grant promote public’s access to #LocalWASeafood

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Washington Sea Grant have teamed up to encourage all Washingtonians to celebrate Ceviche Day this Sunday, June 28, to bring awareness to the state’s abundance and variety of locally caught seafood.

Washington residents – even those who don’t fish themselves – have access year-round to some of the world’s healthiest and most sustainable seafood. The state’s commercial seafood industry, which drives a $600,000,000 yearly boost to Washington’s economy, is currently delivering Dungeness crab, Albacore tuna, rockfish, pink shrimp, and other fish and shellfish to families’ tables across the state. This comes at a time when reduced restaurant, market, and global trade demand during the COVID-19 pandemic has strained commercial fishing buyers and processors.    

“When you serve up Washington seafood harvested fresh from our coastal communities, you’re not only supporting more than 20,000 people who make up our state’s commercial fishing fleet, you’re also beginning to fully experience all that this state has to offer,” said Larry Phillips, coastal region director with WDFW. “We can’t think of a better way to celebrate the diversity of seafood that the summer season brings to the northwest than ceviche – it’s so versatile.” 

With its roots in Mexico, Central and South America, ceviche is a popular seafood dish that traditionally combines raw fish or seafood with lime juice in a simple appetizer, side, or main dish. Ceviche often varies by recipe depending on its country and regional origin. 

For the week following Ceviche Day on June 28, WDFW and Washington Sea Grant will share seafood recipes that highlight a variety of locally caught seafood products with information on how they are managed and where they can be purchased. 

“We are pleased to be partnering with WDFW in an effort to highlight the value that our local commercial fisheries bring to Washington consumers,” said W. Russell Callender, director of Washington Sea Grant. “Through sharing recipes widely and providing useful information to consumers, we hope to increase consumer understanding and access to Washington’s sustainable seafood resources.”

Need some help figuring out which of the wide variety of in-season seafood to prepare? Visit this blog post for suggested spot shrimp, tuna, geoduck, and salmon ceviche preparations from WDFW and Washington Sea Grant staff and their families: https://medium.com/@wdfw/celebrate-june-28-ceviche-day-with-local-washington-seafood-7d9678b14bf1

More information about when and where to buy locally sourced Washington seafood is available at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/where-to-buy-local-seafood. For more seafood recipe ideas, visit Washington Sea Grant’s News Blog: https://wsg.washington.edu/wsg-news-post/safe-sustainable-seafood/

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting, and perpetuating fish, wildlife, and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting, and other recreation opportunities.

Washington Sea Grant, based within the College of the Environment at the University of Washington, helps people understand and address the challenges facing Washington’s ocean and coasts through marine research, technical expertise and education.