2021-2022 Shellfishing Licenses

Save the date: March 31 is the date all 2020-2021 annual shellfishing licenses expire. New licenses are on sale April 1. Get your annual shellfishing license and enjoy all the other shellfishing activities that are possible around WA State, including the Puget Sound and beyond.

Surf Zone Phytoplankton Assemblages

Say what?… Below is the “Ides of March” update from Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). We continue to keep you updated with the best information on recreational razor clamming in WA State.

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RECREATIONAL RAZOR CLAM UPDATE, March 15, 2021: The most recent razor clam domoic acid test results look a little more encouraging than what we have seen to date. The details are below. However, no future razor clam dates will be announced until domoic acid levels in razor clams drop below the action level. We plan to collect the next set of samples at the end of March and will have a clearer picture then if any digging might occur in April or May.

MARINE TOXIN UPDATE:

Listed below are the most recent marine toxin levels, as announced by the Washington Department of Health (WDOH).  To see previous results, see the web link below.

Recall, before a beach can be opened for the harvest of razor clams, WDOH protocol requires that all razor clam samples collected from that beach must test under the action level (20 ppm for domoic acid; 80 µg/100g for PSP; and 16 µg/100g for DSP) on both of two required sample collections, that must be spaced 7 to 10 days apart. The results must also show a declining trend between samples.

Note that in all these samples; only razor clam meat tissue is tested.

Long Beach Area E (north): Collected 3/10/21

·                     domoic acid =   26 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Twin Harbors Area CL (middle): Collected 3/10/21

·                     domoic acid =   31 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Copalis Area XL (middle): Collected 3/10/21

·                     domoic acid =   22 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area CP (middle): Collected 3/10/21

·                     domoic acid =   19 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Over-all, Washington razor clams continue to follow the historical pattern of slowly depurating (losing) domoic acid and for the last several months we have observed the levels “bounce around” considerably. As we have previous described, this is a result the individual 12 clams we randomly harvest when we are collecting samples. However, the report above shows some nice declines on all beaches. If you are interested, you can check out the historical domoic acid data at the link below.

These results and the historical record of domoic acid events can be found at: https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/basics/domoic-acid/levels  (click on “show historical data”) and then hover your curser over the data points for more detail).

Along with sampling collecting razor clam every two week, WDFW together with our colleagues in the ORHAB (Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom) partnership continue on-going observations of the surf zone phytoplankton assemblages.

WDFW Update on Razor Clam Digs

Below is an update on razor clamming and the marine toxin situation from Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

———-

RECREATIONAL RAZOR CLAM UPDATE: No future razor clam dates will be announced until domoic acid levels in razor clams drop below the action level. We have no projections of when that might be. However, we do know that in three of the four major domoic acid events that occurred in the fall (1991-92, 1997-98 and 2002-03), domoic acid levels in razor clams remained elevated through the end of the season.

We will continue to test every two weeks. To see previous results, see the web link below.

MARINE TOXIN UPDATE:

Listed below are the most recent marine toxin levels, as announced by the Washington Department of Health (WDOH).

Recall, before a beach can be opened for the harvest of razor clams, WDOH protocol requires that all razor clam samples collected from that beach must test under the action level (20 ppm for domoic acid; 80 µg/100g for PSP; and 16 µg/100g for DSP) on both of two required sample collections, that must be spaced 7 to 10 days apart.

Note that in all these samples; only razor clam meat tissue is tested.

Long Beach Area E (north): Collected 2/24/21

·                     domoic acid =   57 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Twin Harbors Area CL (middle): Collected 2/23/21

·                     domoic acid =   39 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Copalis Area XL (middle): Collected 2/23/21

·                     domoic acid =   26 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area BC (middle): Collected 2/23/21

·                     domoic acid =   29 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

As you can see, Washington razor clams continue to follow the historical pattern of slowly depurating (losing) domoic acid. The hope for getting a chance to dig any time soon is fading. We also are observing the levels “bounce around” considerably, as they have in past events. This is a result the individual 12 clams we harvest when we are collecting samples. The toxin “load” can vary greatly between individual clams. The laboratory protocol requires the clams to be cleaned and then the meat from all 12 (per area) are blended together. Then a sample of that mixture is analyzed and one result is reported for that area.  If you are interested, you can check out the historical domoic acid data at the link below.

These results and the historical record of domoic acid events can be found at: https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/basics/domoic-acid/levels  (click on “show historical data”) and then hover your curser over the data points for more detail).

Along with sampling collecting razor clam every two week, WDFW together with our colleagues in the ORHAB (Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom) partnership continue on-going observations of the surf zone phytoplankton assemblages. 

Algae Blob Redux

A concerned Razor Clam Society follower inquired as follows:

“With closures in WA and, as far as I can tell, all of the OR coast as well as even CA, I was wondering if anyone has access to historical records to see how widespread the acid problem can be – namely if it’s ever been documented along all coasts simultaneously before.  I do have access through WDFW to WA history but am wondering about the other states.”

This 2015 article from the Seattle Times describes the last Massive Oceanic Algae Bloom (MOAB) [our acronym]. Mother of all Algae Blooms….. You decide…

In response, Dan Ayres, Coastal Shellfish Manager for WDFW confirms that, “We are sampling every two weeks as low tides and surf conditions allow. The most recent samples were collected on 2/23 and 2/24 with results due sometime early next week.”

We encourage readers to continue to ask questions and we will seek responses that inform.

Toxic Clam Alert

This just in from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

RECREATIONAL RAZOR CLAM UPDATE: No future razor clam dates will be announced until domoic acid levels in razor clams drop below the action level. We have no projections of when that might be. However, we do know that in three of the four major domoic acid events that occurred in the fall (1991-92, 1997-98 and 2002-03),  domoic acid levels in razor clams remained evaluated through the end of the season.

We will continue to test every two weeks. To see previous results, see the web link below.

MARINE TOXIN UPDATE:

Listed below are the most recent marine toxin levels, as announced by the Washington Department of Health (WDOH).

Recall, before a beach can be opened for the harvest of razor clams, WDOH protocol requires that all razor clam samples collected from that beach must test under the action level (20 ppm for domoic acid; 80 µg/100g for PSP; and 16 µg/100g for DSP) on both of two required sample collections, that must be spaced 7 to 10 days apart.

Note that in all these samples; only razor clam meat tissue is tested.

These samples were all collected on 02/08/2021.

Long Beach Area E (north):

·                     domoic acid =   56 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Twin Harbors Area CL (middle):

·                     domoic acid =   49 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Copalis Area K (south)

·                     domoic acid =   50 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Copalis Area XL (middle)

·                     domoic acid =   28 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Copalis Area GS (north)

·                     domoic acid =   23 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area CP (middle)

·                     domoic acid =   19 ppm

·                     PSP = none detected

·                     DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area MP (north)

•              domoic acid =   34 ppm

•              PSP = none detected

•              DSP = none detected

The story remains the same, razor clams are following the historical pattern of slowly depurating (losing) domoic acid. We also are observing the levels “bounce around” considerably, as they have in past events. This is a result the individual 12 clams we harvest when we are collecting samples. The toxin “load” can vary greatly between individual clams. The laboratory protocol requires the clams to be cleaned and then the meat from all 12 (per area) are blended together. Then a sample of that mixture is analyzed and one result is reported for that area.  If you are interested, you can check out the historical domoic acid data at the link below.

These results and the historical record of domoic acid events can be found at: https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/basics/domoic-acid/levels  (click on “show historical data”) and then hover your curser over the data points for more detail).

Along with sampling collecting razor clam every two week, WDFW together with our colleagues in the ORHAB (Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom) partnership continue on-going observations of the surf zone phytoplankton assemblages. 

with our colleagues in the ORHAB (Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom) partnership continue on-going observations of the surf zone phytoplankton assemblages. 

Got Clams; Razor Clam Update

An information release from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

RECREATIONAL RAZOR CLAM UPDATE: No future razor clam dates will be announced until domoic acid levels in razor clams drop below the action level. We have no projections of when that might be.

We will continue to test every two weeks. To see previous results, see the web link below.

MARINE TOXIN UPDATE:

Listed below are the most recent marine toxin levels, as announced by the Washington Department of Health
(WDOH).

Recall, before a beach can be opened for the harvest of razor clams, WDOH protocol requires that all razor clam samples collected from that beach must test under the action level (20 ppm for domoic acid; 80 μg/100g for PSP; and 16 μg/100g for DSP) on both of two required sample collections, that must be spaced 7 to 10 days apart.

Note that in all these samples; only razor clam meat tissue is tested.

These samples were all collected on 01/28/2021.

Long Beach Area E (north):
• domoic acid = 22 ppm
• PSP = none detected
• DSP = none detected

Twin Harbors Area CL (middle):
• domoic acid = 30 ppm
• PSP = none detected
• DSP = none detected

Copalis Area K (south)
• domoic acid = 27 ppm
• PSP = none detected
• DSP = none detected

Copalis Area XL (middle)
• domoic acid = 32 ppm
• PSP = none detected
• DSP = none detected

Copalis Area GS (north)
• domoic acid = 49 ppm
• PSP = none detected
• DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area CP (middle)
• domoic acid = 30 ppm
• PSP = none detected
• DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area MP (north)
• domoic acid = 33 ppm
• PSP = none detected

• DSP = none detected

As we reported earlier this month, razor clams are following the historical pattern of slowly depurating (losing) domoic acid. We also are observing the levels “bounce around” some, as they have in past events. This is a result the individual 12 clams we harvest when we are collecting samples. The toxin “load” can vary greatly between individual clams. The laboratory protocol requires the clams to be cleaned and then the meat from all 12 (per area) are blended together. Then a sample of that mixture is analyzed and one result is reported for that area. If you are interested, you can check out the historical domoic acid data at the link below.


These results and the historical record of domoic acid events can be found at:
https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/basics/domoic-acid/levels (click on “show historical data”) and then hover your
curser over the data points for more detail).

Along with sampling collecting razor clam every two week, WDFW together with our colleagues in the ORHAB
(Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom) partnership continue on-going observations of the surf zone phytoplankton
assemblages.

Freedom

This just in from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

WDFW Police save and release illegally trapped bald eagle; refer charges to Clallam County

February 2, 2021 OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Police (WDFW) last week referred charges to the Clallam County Prosecutor against an individual who, among other trapping violations, had trapped a bald eagle with illegal steel jawed leghold traps.

In November 2020, WDFW Police received a report of a domestic dog that had become trapped in a steel jawed leghold trap. The dog’s owners had managed to free the dog but reported that a bald eagle was also caught in another trap just feet away.

WDFW Police Sgt. Rosenberger responded and found a mature bald eagle struggling to free it’s talon from one of the traps. The sergeant was able to immobilize the eagle, remove it from the trap and assess for injuries.

“Thankfully the bald eagle didn’t have any injuries or broken bones,” said Sgt. Rosenberger. “This was a rare poaching incident where the poached animal was still alive and able to be released back into the wild immediately on-site. It was a once-in-a-career event watching the eagle take flight on a crisp sunny day with the surrounding hills colored by fall leaves.”  

WDFW officers monitored the trapping site and seized additional illegal traps. The WDFW officer’s investigation led them to a suspect who resides in Clallam County. The suspect admitted to WDFW officers during an interview to setting several unpadded steel jawed leghold traps and wire snares, which were used to capture and kill two coyotes. WDFW Police have now referred 16 criminal charges against the individual to the Clallam County Prosecutor’s office.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting, and perpetuating fish, wildlife, and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting, and other recreation opportunities. 

January 2021 Razor Clam Update

For all those that have asked the Razor Clam Society about the status of the razor clam season, we provide to you the most recent update below from Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

———————–

MARINE TOXIN UPDATE:

Listed below are the most recent marine toxin levels, as announced by the Washington Department of Health (WDOH).

Recall, before a beach can be opened for the harvest of razor clams, WDOH protocol requires that all razor clam samples collected from that beach must test under the action level (20 ppm for domoic acid; 80 µg/100g for PSP; and 16 µg/100g for DSP) on both of two required sample collections, that must be spaced 7 to 10 days apart.

Note that in all these samples; only razor clam meat tissue is tested.

These samples were all collected on 01/11/2021.

Long Beach Area E (north):

•             domoic acid =   45 ppm

•             PSP = none detected

•             DSP = none detected

Twin Harbors Area CL (middle):

•             domoic acid =   43 ppm

•             PSP = none detected

•             DSP = none detected

Copalis Area K (south)

•             domoic acid =   28 ppm

•             PSP = none detected

•             DSP = none detected

Copalis Area XL (middle)

•             domoic acid =   25 ppm

•             PSP = none detected

•             DSP = none detected

Copalis Area GS (north)

•             domoic acid =   27 ppm

•             PSP = none detected

•             DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area CP (middle)

•             domoic acid =   36 ppm

•             PSP = none detected

•             DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area MP (north)

•             domoic acid =   25 ppm

•             PSP = none detected

•             DSP = none detected

As we reported in December, razor clams are following the historical pattern of slowly depurating (losing) domoic acid. We also are observing the levels “bounce around” some, as they have in past events. This is a result the individual 12 clams we harvest when we are collecting samples. The toxin “load” can vary greatly between individual clams. The laboratory protocol requires the clams to be cleaned and then the meat from all 12 (per area) are blended together. Then a sample of that mixture is analyzed and one result is reported for that area.  If you are interested, you can check out the historical domoic acid data at the link below.

These results and the historical record of domoic acid events can be found at: https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/basics/domoic-acid/levels  (click on “show historical data”) and then hover your curser over the data points for more detail).

Along with sampling collecting razor clam every two week, WDFW together with our colleagues in the ORHAB (Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom) partnership continue on-going observations of the surf zone phytoplankton assemblages.