Razor Clam Dig Confirmed at Copalis, Mocrocks

According to a press release from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) Copalis and Mocrocks beaches will open later this week for razor clam digging along with Long Beach and Twin Harbors.

Shellfish managers confirmed digging at Copalis and Mocrocks after marine toxin test results indicated clams from those beaches are safe to eat. Last week, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved an opening at Long Beach and Twin Harbors.

State health officials had asked for an additional test on clams at Copalis and Mocrocks after seeing an indication that toxin levels may be rising on those two northern beaches.

Tests conducted this week found toxin levels at Copalis and Mocrocks meet state health standards.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and evening low tides:

  • Nov. 2, Thursday, 6:03 p.m.; 0.1 feet; Copalis
  • Nov. 3, Friday, 6:47 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 4, Saturday, 7:31 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Nov. 5, Sunday, 7:16 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

The DAILY LIMIT per person is 15 clams, no matter what condition they are in, once removed from the sand. That limit is subject to change. Always check with official sources if you have any questions. Digging prior to Noon during the Fall Season on the approved days is not allowed. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. And, each digger must keep their razor clams in a separate container. Don’t mix your clams. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Seward Park Audubon Center, Saturday, November 4, at 1:00pm

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Seward Park Audubon Center and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger

When:  Saturday, November 4, 2017, 1:00 pm

WHERE:  Seward Park Audubon Center
5902 Lake Washington Blvd. S, Seattle, WA 98118

Cost: Free

WDFW Approves Nov. 3-5 Razor Clam Dig

According to a press release from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) a razor clam dig in early November will go ahead as planned at Long Beach and Twin Harbors, but the status of two other ocean beaches tentatively scheduled to open depends on results from additional toxin testing.

WDFW has approved the Nov. 3-5 dig on evening tides at Long Beach and Twin Harbors after marine toxin tests showed that clams on those beaches are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed before noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and evening low tides:

  • Nov. 3, Friday, 6:47 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 4, Saturday, 7:31 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors
  • Nov. 5, Sunday, 7:16 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors

The DAILY LIMIT per person is 15 clams, no matter what condition they are in, once removed from the sand. That limit is subject to change. Always check with official sources if you have any questions. Digging prior to Noon during the Fall Season on the approved days is not allowed. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. And, each digger must keep their razor clams in a separate container. Don’t mix your clams. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Harbor History Museum, Tuesday, October 17, at 6:00pm

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Harbor History Museum and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger

When:  Tuesday, October 17, 2017, 6:00 pm

WHERE:Harbor History Museum
4121 Harborview Drive , Gig Harbor, WA 98332
Cost: Free

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Yelm Timberland Library, Saturday, October 14, at 2:00pm

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Yelm Timberland Library and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger

When: Saturday, October 14, 2017, 2:00 pm

WHERE: Yelm Timberland Library
210 Prairie Park St., Yelm, WA 98597

Cost: Free

Digging & Giving: 2017-2018 Fundraising Campaign Launched

cropped-razorclamsticker5.jpg

In order to kick off the razor clamming season right, the Razor Clam Society has launched a new fundraising campaign. Please visit the campaign fundraising page and take a look at the exciting gifts you can receive for your generous donation. All donations are tax deductible.

Thank you & have an enjoyable razor clamming season!

The Razor Clam Society

https://igg.me/at/ijZQHWKZTY8

2017-2018 Razor Clam Season Opener Approved

IMG_3379According to a press release from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) the first razor clam dig of the fall season will get underway Oct. 6-7 at four ocean beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has approved the dig on evening tides at Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks after marine toxin tests showed that clams on those beaches are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and evening low tides:

  • Oct. 6, Friday, 7:49 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 7, Saturday, 8:33 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

The DAILY LIMIT per person is 15 clams, no matter what condition they are in, once removed from the sand. That limit is subject to change. Always check with official sources if you have any questions. Digging prior to Noon during the Fall Season on the approved days is not allowed. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. And, each digger must keep their razor clams in a separate container. Don’t mix your clams. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.