Know Your Limits

IMG_1464As previously mentioned in our posting here, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife has temporarily increased the limit of allowable razor clams to be harvested at Long Beach ONLY, beginning April 26 and running through May 1.

Limits at Copalis, Mocrocks, and Twin Harbors remains at 15. 

And don’t forget; the 2017 Long Beach Razor Clam Festival, held April 29 and 30, coincides with the digs. For more information, visit the festival website at http://longbeachrazorclamfestival.com/.

Additional information on how testing for shellfish safety occurs, and why it is needed, can be found on the Department of Health Shellfish Program website.

Also, be sure to check out the Razor Clam Society beach map located here.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

Long Beach Open for Digging; WDFW Increases Razor Clam Limit to 25; 6 Days of Digs Confirmed

HUGE news just out in a press release from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW), announcing an increase in the limit of razor clams to 25 beginning tomorrow, April 26, and running through May 1. THE LIMIT INCREASE ONLY APPLIES TO LONG BEACH.

Razor clamming at Twin Harbors, Mocrocks and Copalis is still limited to 15 clams per day. Diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams (or first 25 clams at Long Beach) they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

Approved dig dates, beaches, and low tides are as follows:

  • April 26, Wednesday, 7:09 a.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 27, Thursday, 7:55 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 28, Friday, 8:42 a.m.; -1.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • April 29, Saturday, 9:32 a.m.; -1.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 30, Sunday, 10:24 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • May 1, Monday, 11:20 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Long Beach

And don’t forget; the 2017 Long Beach Razor Clam Festival, held April 29 and 30, coincides with the digs. For more information, visit the festival website at http://longbeachrazorclamfestival.com/.

Additional information on how testing for shellfish safety occurs, and why it is needed, can be found on the Department of Health Shellfish Program website.

Also, be sure to check out the Razor Clam Society beach map located here.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

Marine Toxin Levels on the Rise, Upcoming Digs Delayed, “Unicorn” of Clams Found

According to a press release from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW), rising marine toxin levels of domoic acid will delay the first two days of a tentatively scheduled 8 day dig that was set to begin on April 24 and run through May 1.

“Domoic acid is a natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae that can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities. The toxin has disrupted razor clam digs along Washington’s coast over the past two years”, the press release states.

Tentatively scheduled (NOT YET APPROVED) dig dates, beaches, and low tides are as:

  • April 26, Wednesday, 7:09 a.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 27, Thursday, 7:55 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 28, Friday, 8:42 a.m.; -1.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • April 29, Saturday, 9:32 a.m.; -1.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 30, Sunday, 10:24 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • May 1, Monday, 11:20 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Long Beach

And in other shellfish news: Scientists have FINALLY found the habitat & origin of Kuphus polythalamia, or Giant Shipworm. It’s not actually a worm at all, but the longest clam, or bivalve, on earth. Should make for some interesting chowder recipes!

5 Digs Approved on 4 Beaches

According to a press release from Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW), razor clam digs have been approved beginning April 12 through April 16.

The upcoming digs have approved on the following beaches, dates and low tides.

  •  April 12, Wednesday, 8:08 a.m., 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach

  • April 13, Thursday, 8:43 a.m., 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach

  • April 14, Friday, 9:18 a.m., 0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach

  • April 15, Saturday, 9:55 a.m., 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach

  • April 16, Sunday, 10:36 a.m., 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach

Be Aware: All digs are morning tides.

New Annual Shellfish Licenses Are Required Beginning April 1. 

Additional information on how testing for shellfish safety occurs, and why it is needed, can be found on the Department of Health Shellfish Program website.

Also, be sure to check out the Razor Clam Society beach map located here.

And, as per state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2016-17 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

WDFW is also urging clam diggers to: avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand on the southern section of Twin Harbors beach and at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula. The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and “horns.”

To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line.

Coastal Storm Alert for Friday’s Dig

Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) has sent out an alert to all razor clammers heading out to Twin Harbors to dig. That alert comes from the Grays Harbor County Emergency Management. The text appears below:

The National Weather Service in Seattle has issued a HIGH WIND WATCH for the central coast, (Grays Harbor County), from 8am – midnight on Friday. Strong winds and rain will impact the coast in the morning, then taper off a bit before becoming strong again in the late afternoon and early evening. South winds are forecast to be 25 -40 mph sustained, gusting to 60 mph.
CLAM DIG ALERT
Associated with this storm will be growing surf conditions affecting the Clam Dig in Twin Harbors Friday evening.  The Surf will grow to 22’-28’ on Friday making beaches very hazardous with long wave run –up, potential for numerous sneaker waves, overtopping of piers and jetties and significant beach erosion. DO NOT TURN YOUR BACK TO THE SEA.
Be prepared for the possibility of localized power outages during this wind event due to broken branches, possible fallen trees and power lines.
Charles T Wallace, Deputy Director
Grays Harbor County Emergency Management