October 6-7 Washington State Razor Clamming Season Opener “Hinges” On Tests

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According to a a recent press release issued by Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW), the previously announced Washington razor clamming season opener, tentatively scheduled for October 6-7, “hinges” on additional toxin test results.

State shellfish managers said they had hoped to announce on September 27 whether the tentatively scheduled dig would proceed. However, state health officials have asked for an additional round of toxin tests due to rising levels of domoic acid. A natural toxin produced by certain types of algae, domoic acid can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities.

Learn more about the testing process and marine toxins here.

Toxin test results are expected Tuesday or Wednesday of next week.

The tentatively scheduled dates for the season opener occurring on evening low tides and beaches are as follows:

  • Oct. 6Friday7:49 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 7Saturday8:33 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

Be sure to check our beach map to find your beach:

The DAILY LIMIT per person is 15 clams, no matter what condition they are in, once removed from the sand. That limit is subject to change. Always check with official sources if you have any questions. Digging prior to Noon during the Fall Season on the approved days is not allowed. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Coupeville Library, Monday, October 2, at 2:00pm

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Coupeville Library and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger

When:  Monday, October 2, 2017, 2:00 pm

WHERE:  Coupeville Library
788 NW Alexander Street , Coupeville, WA 98239

Cost: Free

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum, Saturday, September 30, at 2:00pm

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger

When:  Saturday, September 30, 2017, 2:00 pm

WHERE: Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum
115 SE Lake St., Ilwaco, WA 98624

Cost: Free

Digs & Data

Fellow Razor Clammers:

Washington’s razor clam fishery is the best managed razor clam fishery. The reasons for that exist in the the best practices, dedication, and management foresight that goes into ensuring that Washington’s razor clam fishery continues to be a safe and sustainable resource for all those that utilize the fishery for generations to come.

Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) has released the following statement as a followup to its previously announced tentative 2017 Fall / Winter dig schedule. Dig into the data:

———————–

RECREATIONAL RAZOR CLAM OPENER: The first October 2017 recreational razor clam opener remains tentative as the marine toxin tests are completed. The following are the results from the first round of tests:

MARINE TOXIN UPDATE:

Listed below are the most recent marine toxin levels, as announced by the Washington Department of Health (WDOH) on September 21, 2017. This is the FIRST of two rounds of razor clam samples required by WDOH before any recreational razor clam opener. As you can see, these samples are all below the action level for domoic acid, Paralytic Shellfish Poison (PSP) and Diarrhetic Shellfish Poison (DSP). The second and final round of sampling is scheduled for September 25with results by September 28.

Recall, before a beach can be opened for the harvest of razor clams, WDOH protocol requires that all razor clam samples collected from that beach must test under the action level (20 ppm for domoic acid; 80 µg/100g for PSP; and 16 µg/100g for DSP) on both of the two required sample collections.

Note that in all of these samples; only razor clam meat tissue is tested.

These samples were all collected on 9/18/17.

Long Beach Area E (north):

  • domoic acid =   6 ppm
  • PSP = <38 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Long Beach Area OY (middle):

  • domoic acid =   8 ppm
  • PSP = 45 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Long Beach Area XA (middle):

  • domoic acid =   5 ppm
  • PSP = 41 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Long Beach Area A (south):

  • domoic acid =   8 ppm
  • PSP = 39 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Twin Harbors Area XH (north):

  • domoic acid =   6 ppm
  • PSP = 45 ug/100g
  • DSP = <1 ug/100g

Twin Harbors Area CL (middle):

  • domoic acid =   10 ppm
  • PSP = 46 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Twin Harbors Area G (south):

  • domoic acid =   12 ppm
  • PSP = 44 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Copalis Area GS (north)

  • domoic acid =    9 ppm
  • PSP = <38 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Copalis Area XL (middle)

  • domoic acid =    10 ppm
  • PSP = 40 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Copalis Area K (south)

  • domoic acid =    12 ppm
  • PSP = 41 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area MP (north)

  • domoic acid =    7 ppm
  • PSP = <38 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

Mocrocks Area CP (middle)

  • domoic acid =    4 ppm
  • PSP = <38 ug/100g
  • DSP = none detected

 

For more information on marine toxins and other harmful algal blooms, see the following links:

WDFW Seeks Razor Clammer Comments

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As previously announced, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) State shellfish managers have provided an email seeking public input on management options, including scheduling for spring digs.

In an exclusive missive with the Razor Clam Society, Dan Ayres, WDFW Coastal Shellfish Program Manager stated, “We’ve chosen not to put an end date on our public comment. We’re asking for comments for winter and spring season setting. So if folks had any comments in by mid December…that would be great.” Ayres further went on to comment, “I’m hoping folks will get a chance to get out and look at the status of populations firsthand before they comment.”

So, razor clam enthusiasts, get out on the beach and dig some razor clams. Send your comments and thoughts to WDFW. Details below:

Comments on the spring digs can be sent via email to: razorclams@dfw.wa.gov.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Aberdeen Timberland Library & Westport Timberland Library: September 23rd

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Aberdeen Timberland Library & Westport Timberland Library and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger

When:   September 23rd, 11:00 am
Where: Aberdeen Timberland Library
               121 E. Market St.
              Aberdeen, WA 98520

Cost: Free

When:   September 23rd, 2:00 pm
Where:  Westport Timberland Library
                101 E. Harms Dr.
               Westport, WA 98595

Cost: Free
On the Web: www.humanities.org/calendar-events

 

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Tacoma’s Wheelock Public Library, September 19th, 7:00pm

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Tacoma Public Library- Wheelock Library and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger
When: September 19th, 7:00 pm
Where: Tacoma Public Library- Wheelock Library
3722 North 26 streetTacoma, WA 98407

Cost: Free
On the Web: www.humanities.org/calendar-events