WDFW Seeks Razor Clammer Comments

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As previously announced, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) State shellfish managers have provided an email seeking public input on management options, including scheduling for spring digs.

In an exclusive missive with the Razor Clam Society, Dan Ayres, WDFW Coastal Shellfish Program Manager stated, “We’ve chosen not to put an end date on our public comment. We’re asking for comments for winter and spring season setting. So if folks had any comments in by mid December…that would be great.” Ayres further went on to comment, “I’m hoping folks will get a chance to get out and look at the status of populations firsthand before they comment.”

So, razor clam enthusiasts, get out on the beach and dig some razor clams. Send your comments and thoughts to WDFW. Details below:

Comments on the spring digs can be sent via email to: razorclams@dfw.wa.gov.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Aberdeen Timberland Library & Westport Timberland Library: September 23rd

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Aberdeen Timberland Library & Westport Timberland Library and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger

When:   September 23rd, 11:00 am
Where: Aberdeen Timberland Library
               121 E. Market St.
              Aberdeen, WA 98520

Cost: Free

When:   September 23rd, 2:00 pm
Where:  Westport Timberland Library
                101 E. Harms Dr.
               Westport, WA 98595

Cost: Free
On the Web: www.humanities.org/calendar-events

 

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Tacoma’s Wheelock Public Library, September 19th, 7:00pm

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Tacoma Public Library- Wheelock Library and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, available online here & here. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger
When: September 19th, 7:00 pm
Where: Tacoma Public Library- Wheelock Library
3722 North 26 streetTacoma, WA 98407

Cost: Free
On the Web: www.humanities.org/calendar-events

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger- Olympia Timberland Library, September 13th, 7:30pm

Razor Clam enthusiasts, mark you calendars for an exciting event hosted by Olympia Timberland Library and Humanities Washington. You are invited to this FREE event for an engaging conversation with polymath David Berger, a member of the 2016-17 Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau.

David, seeks to answer and expand upon the generations old question: What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf?

The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join author and clam digger David Berger to explore the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

About David Berger:
David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, being published in fall 2017. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. Berger lives in Seattle.

The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon with David Berger

When: September 13th, 7:30 pm
Where: Olympia Timberland Library – Map
Cost: Free
On the Web: www.humanities.org/calendar-events

 

WDFW Schedules Tentative Digs Through December

Get ready to dig razor clammers! According to a press release from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), a tentative schedule for the fall razor clam season is set to begin in early October and run through the end of December.

As is always the case, final approval of all scheduled openings will depend on results of marine toxin tests, which are usually conducted about a week before a dig is scheduled to begin. WA Department of Health (DOH) is directly involved in this testing to ensure the razor clams are safe to eat. Without the additional approval from DOH, tentatively scheduled digs may be canceled. Also, because DOH is continually testing the razor clams, even approved digs can sometimes be canceled for safe reasons.

Also in the press release, WDFW State shellfish managers have provided an email seeking public input on management options, including scheduling for spring digs. Comments on the spring digs can be sent via email to: razorclams@dfw.wa.gov. Deadline for comments TBD.

WDFW further announced that based on beach surveys conducted over the summer, estimates of the total razor clam population on Washington’s beaches has decreased significantly from last season, that will result in fewer days of digging for the new season.

State shellfish managers stated that the decline in clam populations was likely caused, at least in part, by an extended period of low salinity in surf zone ocean waters, particularly those near Long Beach and Twin Harbors. The specific cause of the low salinity was not made clear.

The proposed razor clam digs through December are listed below, along with evening low tide times and beaches. Be sure to check our beach map:

  • Oct. 6, Friday, 7:49 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 7, Saturday, 8:33 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 2Thursday6:03 p.m.; 0.1 feet; Copalis
  • Nov. 3, Friday, 6:47 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Nov. 4, Saturday, 7:31 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Nov. 5, Sunday, 7:16 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 1, Friday, 4:42 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Copalis
  • Dec. 2, Saturday, 6:49 p.m.; -1.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 3, Sunday, 6:15 p.m.; -1.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • Dec. 4, Monday, 7:02 p.m.; -1.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • Dec. 31, Sunday, 5:12 p.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

The DAILY LIMIT per person is 15 clams, no matter what condition they are in, once removed from the sand. That limit is subject to change. Always check with official sources if you have any questions. Digging prior to Noon during the Fall Season on the approved days is not allowed. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.